Brazil-Sports
  • In this Nov. 19, 2013 file photo Sweden's forward Zlatan Ibrahimovic removes the captain's armband, after the World Cup 2014 qualifying playoff second leg soccer match between Sweden and Portugal, at Friends Arena in Stockholm. Sweden lost 2-3. The tournament in Brazil will be a poorer spectacle without Zlatan Ibrahimovic strutting his stuff for Sweden, or Welshman Gareth Bale leaving defenders in his wake with his searing pace. Prolific scorer Robert Lewandowski of Poland, Czech goalkeeper Peter Cech and r

    They are some of the biggest names in soccer, or on the verge of becoming a star, but they won't be playing at the World Cup next year.

    LAST UPDATE : Nov 21, 2013, 11:11 AM EST
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  • Polluted water surrounds the site of the Olympic Park as it is built in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013. Nearly 70 percent of the city’s sewage goes untreated, meaning runoff from Rio’s many slums and poor neighborhoods drain into waters soon to host many of the world’s best athletes during the 2016 Summer Games.

    In the neon green waters around the site of the future Olympic Park, the average fecal pollution rate is 78 times that of the Brazilian government's "satisfactory" limit.

    LAST UPDATE : Nov 20, 2013, 11:58 AM EST
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  • France's soccer team celebrate after defeating Ukraine during the World Cup qualifying playoff second-leg soccer match between France and Ukraine at Stade de France stadium in Saint Denis, outside Paris, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013. France beats Ukaine 3-0 in playoff second leg to qualify for World Cup.

    Greece, Ghana and Algeria also earned berths, and Mexico took a 5-1 lead into the second leg of its playoff against New Zealand.

    LAST UPDATE : Nov 19, 2013, 11:04 PM EST
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  • In this Dec. 23, 2011 file photo, former soccer stars Romario, left, and Ronaldo give a news conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Romario and Ronaldo are at odds over the World Cup in Brazil, criticizing each other's conflicting comments about what the tournament means to the country's population.

    In a clash of Brazilian soccer greats and World Cup champions, Romario and Ronaldo are at odds over what the showpiece tournament means to the country.

    LAST UPDATE : Nov 08, 2013, 11:36 AM EST
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  • A woman arranges pictograms icons that will be used for the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games at a launch ceremony in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013. The pictograms for each Olympic and Paralympic sports are made up of curved, fluid lines meant to represent each of the sports, and the natural curves of the hills and beaches that surround Rio de Janeiro.

    Carlos Nuzman, the president of the organizing committee and head of the Brazil Olympic Committee, is being pressed about the pace of work.

    LAST UPDATE : Nov 07, 2013, 6:05 PM EST
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  • This April 11, 2013 photo shows the Olympic Park under construction in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With financial backing for the 2106 Olympics drying up, Brazilian organizers are scrambling to raise record amounts of local sponsorship money to cover any budget shortfall and avoid a government bailout.

    With public money for the 2016 Olympics getting tougher to find, Brazilian organizers are scrambling to raise record amounts of local sponsorship revenue to cover any budget shortfall.

    LAST UPDATE : Nov 07, 2013, 10:27 AM EST
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  • Brazil's Sports Minister Aldo Rebelo adjusts his glasses during a news conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. Rebelo is not expecting waves of protests during the World Cup next year, saying the Brazilian people will be more worried about celebrating the tournament than complaining of its cost.

    The Brazilian government wants to improve services for the nearly 600,000 international visitors and 3 million local tourists expected at next year's World Cup.

    LAST UPDATE : Nov 04, 2013, 10:12 AM EST
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  • Brazil's Sports Minister Aldo Rebelo adjusts his glasses during a news conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. Rebelo is not expecting waves of protests during the World Cup next year, saying the Brazilian people will be more worried about celebrating the tournament than complaining of its cost.

    Aldo Rebelo doesn't think Brazil will face anti-government protests similar to those that took place during the Confederations Cup this year.

    LAST UPDATE : Oct 29, 2013, 10:35 AM EDT
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